Piercings and Tattoos

Archive for the ‘Ink’ Category

Sep
13

Lou Eyrich’s new Tattoo mania

Posted by Disha Singh on September 13, 2011

Cheers Lou!

On the Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards in Los Angeles, Glee award-winning costume designer, Lou Eyrich showed off “a somewhat different style” a lovely head tattoo.

People might be renouncing her latest hair-do sorry I guess I should say tattoo-do of Lou Eyrich 😉 But I am 100% loving it.

No greys, No Hair-fall just artistically managed hair etched on your head.


It’s not the first time that she has played with her hairstyle. But this time I would like to say that she is looking great in this extra ordinary tattoo. And I would not like forget to appreciate the efforts of the great man behind all these pseudo hair.

Tattoo Alert:

New research has turned up troubling findings about toxic chemicals in tattoo inks, including carcinogens and hormone disruptors.

Inks, which are injected into the skin with small needles, have caused allergic rashes, chronic skin reactions, infection and inflammation from sun exposure, said Elizabeth Tanzi, co-director of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery in Washington, D.C. A study published in July suggested that phthalates and other chemicals may be responsible for some of those problems.

That raises questions about more serious, long-term risks such as skin cancer, says scientists to SFGate.com (Read More…)

Image Courtesy: Dailymail

Jun
03

Hi-Tech Tattoo to test Type 1 diabetes

Posted by Disha Singh on June 3, 2010

Graphic: Christine Daniloff

Several pricks into your finger to track your blood sugar level can be little painful but more a hassle. You might sometime wish for a machine which could be attached to your body and immediately detects your glucose level. Chemical engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are working on carbon nanotubes that could be injected under the skin to reveal blood glucose levels.
Paul Barone and Prof. Michael Strano are working on a new type of blood glucose monitor that could not only eliminate the need for finger pricks but also offer more accurate readings.

Strano and Barone’s sensing system consists of a “tattoo” that’s designed to detect glucose, the nanotubes are wrapped in a polymer that is sensitive to glucose concentrations. A wearable device roughly the size of a wristwatch shines infrared light through the skin and onto the nanotubes, which fluoresce when in contact with glucose, thus displaying the patient’s glucose level.

The researchers plan to create an “ink” of these nanoparticles suspended in a saline solution that could be injected under the skin like a tattoo. The “tattoo” would last for a specified length of time, probably six months, before needing to be refreshed.

Claims are high and it seems pretty useful for those suffering from type 1 diabetes but is it possible to re-etch a tattoo on the same place where first tattoo is done? Or new skin area will be required, if this happens then one fine day you’ll have to switch back to contemporary blood sugar testing device. I think best is to eat healthy and exercise well to keep yourself away from these tattoos. Be more living and etch some real colorful tattoos 😉

Source: MIT

Jul
02

A word with Iconic tattooist, Nick Baxter

Posted by Disha Singh on July 2, 2008

Nick Baxter one of the iconic figures of tattoo industry was interviewed by Piercingntattoos.com to reveal his mind and soul inside and outside the tattooing world. He’s not only a tattooist but an actor, a painter, photographer as well as a writer. He’s the most eligible bachelor in the tattooing industry, who’d not like if you won’t wish him on his birthday i.e. on 5th September 😉 Born at New Haven, Connecticut, now plans to move from Transcend Tattoo, CT, to Austin, Texas, with his friend and fellow artist Jeff Ensminger, Dallas.

This winner of many tattoo convention awards: best sleeve, tattoo of day, etc., will be now seen off and on in CT. Let’s hear more about him in his own words in this interview.

Disha Singh: It’s been about eight years in the tattoo industry, how does it feel and how have things changed regarding your inking over the years?

Nick Baxter: Being 8 years into it feels great, I feel like I have accomplished so much of what I originally set out to do. I love having a network of friends and colleagues whom I travel the world with, work on fun art with, help inspire, and be inspired by. Pretty much everything has changed since I started, it’s completely different now‹a lot has changed in the industry, too, it’s really exploded in popularity and talent level. However, in some ways nothing has changed – I still feel like I’m just me, doing what I love to do, just like always. I till have so much to learn and experience and I still feel young, and like a beginner at times, because there are still many goals I haven’t reached yet and aspects of my art and technique I want to improve.

Disha Singh: How did it feel when you did the first tattoo?

Nick Baxter: It was completely nerve-wracking. I was scared and excited, and overwhelmed with all the things you need to remember to do while tattooing. It felt great though, I had a real sense of accomplishment.

Disha: What’s the inspiration behind your creative tattoo designs?

Nick: It could be anything, really. Life in general is inspiration, all the experiences and memories and emotions and thoughts and interesting things that comprise it. I try to tap into whatever type of inspiration I need for the particular project I’m working on.

Disha: Who are some of your influences, inside and outside of tattooing?

Nick: I have many influences and try to be eclectic, so it’s hard to form any kind of complete list, so just a portion of them I can think of right now are Salvador Dali, J.P. Witkin, Simen Johan, Mark Kessel, H.R. Giger, Guy Aitchison, Tim Hawkinson, Nikko Hurtado, Cindy Sherman, Richard Estes and all Photorealist painters, Charles Santarpia, Megan Merrell, Todd Schorr, Alex Grey, Caravaggio, Michaelangelo, Ron English, Eric White, Leonardo DaVinci, Adrian Dominic, Jeff Ensminger, Russell Mills.

Disha: In a true sense you are an artist who paints body and canvas, as well as a photographer. Please can you throw some light and reveal yourself in all these different roles?

Nick: These are all different aspects of my one driving creative energy. I get to express different parts of myself in each medium, and explore different themes and concepts. I also get to develop and refine different artistic disciplines and physical skills, or crafts. My painting and photography is very meticulous, refined, almost clinical in its approach to technique and subject matter, which appears often to be the opposite of those qualities‹very organic, warm, visceral. My tattooing is more spontaneous, loose, and holistic in its approach.

Disha: You have received many awards, what are the memorable conventions you’ve gone to and is there any target in your mind to be achieved?

Nick: I’ve always loved attending the Hell City tattoo conventions every year, because they are really well put together, organized, fun, and especially accommodating to the artists. I don’t have a target in my mind to achieve at conventions aside from just having a good time and producing some good work if I can.

Disha: What’s your imagination like? How long will you sit and think about a tattoo design before you actually ink it? Do you just bang it out in one shot or do you chip away at it on paper until it’s perfect and then on skin?

Nick: My imagination is a constant back and forth tug of war between the right and left brains, opposing urges for order and rationality and structure, and the opposite attributes of chaos, feeling, intuition. It’s like a never ending lottery-ball machines I definitely feel like I think too much. My tattoo conception process usually involves much more thinking at first than actual drawing. I’ll picture things in my mind, then look at reference materials for ideas and inspiration, then when I sit down to draw it usually gets completed all at once. I don’t bother with making the drawing perfect, in order to allow myself the freedom to create more on skin, and leave the tattooing process open to intuition and spontaneity.

Disha: Are you a perfectionist? Are there any tattoos, paintings, etc. that you wish you could change?

Nick: I am, for better and for worse, an unrelenting perfectionist. There’s a saying that makes me laugh at myself that goes: Perfect isn’t good enough. I analyze everything after I do it and always find something I could improve or try to do differently.

Disha: How much do you charge for a piece?

Nick: I charge an hourly rate for tattoos, and my paintings are reasonably priced as far as fine art prices are concerned, considering the amount of time and effort I put into them.

Disha: What are your likes and dislikes?

Nick: I like the outdoors and nature, creativity, positivity, problem solving, meeting challenges and goals, learning, nice people, animals, hardcore/punk music, freedom, living a vegan straightedge lifestyle. I generally really dislike any form of coercion and violence in order to control other people, or animals, as well as war and fighting, intolerance, suffering and despair, and all those associated ills of the world.

Disha: How did the idea of becoming a tattoo artist come to your mind? Were your parents comfortable with your decision to become a tattoo artist?

Nick: I was always fascinated by body art because it was rebellious, somewhat mysterious, and a really unique way to express yourself. I started to become interested in pursuing it in my mid-teens, and my parents were very unsupportive of that at the time. I think they were uncomfortable with me being a tattoo artist at first, but once they saw that it could be a legitimate, respectable career that could do positive things for me and my life, their opinions changed drastically. Now they support and respect me.

Disha: What we see Nick doing when he is not tattooing?

Nick: Usually I’m making some kind of other art, like painting, drawing, photography, or writing. I also like to experience the outdoors, play sports, read, listen to music, go to hardcore/punk shows, go to art galleries and museums, eat awesome vegan food, meditate, hang out with my cats and human friends.

Disha: Which machine and ink do you use?

Nick: I use mostly Pulse tattoo machines, and 3 brands of tattoo inks: Eternal, Starbrite, and Unique.

Disha: What do you think about FREEDOM -2 ink?

Nick: I’ve never tried it, and haven’t heard much about it. It seems like a great idea. I don’t have much interest in it as of yet, but I am curious to see if it works and if it stays looking great over time.

Disha: Finally, what suggestions do you have for the newbie in the industry and especially to those who want to get tattooed?

Nick: For new tattooists or apprentices, I recommend to stay focused on your art at all costs, be willing to put hours of every single day into study and practice, and stay disciplined. Be honest with yourself and develop a good sense of self-critique. Be hungry for knowledge, but don’t be too proud or afraid to go back to basics whenever necessary, whenever you feel stuck, or frustrated. For potential tattoo collectors, I recommend to be patient and do your research and homework first. You can read an article I co-wrote just for new tattoo collectors, at this address: http://www.offthemaptattoo.com/get-the-perfect-tattoo.html

Thanks for your precious time Nick, it was great to know your better!

Please don’t miss to check out some of his mind blowing tattoo piece at our image gallery.

Apr
18

Tips to prevent your Tattoos from Fading!

Posted by Disha Singh on April 18, 2008

Guy Aitchinson’s Arm Tattoo

(A tattoo by Guy Aitchison)

Fading tattoos become a cause of worry on our face. 🙁 After spending a huge amount to get a tattoo design etched on our skin it gets really very painful to see that tattoo fading.

You can blame your tattooist for this tattoo fading to some extent but it can be your fault also. Yes, your fault of not giving proper aftercare to the tattoo and tattooist’s fault of not placing the pigment in appropriate layer of skin.

There are many reasons behind the fading of tattoos and you should take care of these things: 💡

  • Check that your tattoo artist does not place the pigment on the epidermis, as this constantly sheds dead skin cells to make room for new skin cells. The pigment should penetrate into the middle layer of the skin. Even the middle layer rejuvenate its cells but developing a healthier eating habits help to supply your skin with the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants so that it remain youthful and slows down the process of regeneration of new skin cells.
  • Proper care for about 3-4 weeks is required by a new tattoo. Timely moisturizing and application of ointment is necessary because this will avoid scabbing as scabbing can pull up some of the pigments.
  • Like our skin even our tattoos need good protection from sun rays. As sun’s powerful ultraviolet rays break down our skin and cause wrinkles similarly they can break down the pigments used to color our tattoos. Therefore, application of liberal amount of SPF sunscreen lotion is recommended on the tattoo wherever you move out in sun or go for swimming. In case of swimming and sweating remember to reapply sunscreen lotion over the tattoo.
  • Selection of colors is another factor responsible for the fading of a tattoo. Keep in mind that dark colors like black, blue and greys are more resistant to fading than other colors like red, orange, yellow, purple, magenta, etc.

🙂 So, friends I hope these tips were helpful to you and you’ll always keep them in mind. 🙂

Mar
09

How well you know Homemade Tattoos?

Posted by Disha Singh on March 9, 2008

Yes guys, today I’m here to talk about Homemade Tattoos.

First and the foremost thing to remember is – do not share your needle or ink with anyone as this increases the risk of infection.

Making tattoo ink is a work of patience: Light some candles or ‘diyas’, collect the soot and mix this soot in mustard oil. The ink is ready.

Okay, let’s start making the tattoo needles: Take a piece of bamboo and cut it into very thin needles from this piece make as many as possible, as while tattooing you won’t have to take break to make new needles. First make the outline of the tattoo design by dipping the tip of needles into the ink and then pricking it into your skin. Combine some more needles together and use it for shading the outlined tattoo (the number of needles will consider the width of the line). Then fill the design by pricking ink into the skin with the help of numerous needles.

The procedure of making tattoo ink and tattoo needles is given by a local tattooist Aman Devrani.

Some people use sewing needles also but a great care should be taken to sterilise the needle.

You people might be happy to know how you can ink yourself without spending a huge amount. Hold on for a second and realise this fact that the price charged by your tattooist is for your safety and good. The ink and machines used by the professional tattoo artists are made especially for tattooing synonym to your health safety. Remember there is no price for good health.

Homemade tattoos are also made by using ballpoint pens, fabric paints (which are toxic), and tattoo guns made with small motors and metal wires. By not following proper hygiene and precautions people put themselves at risk for infections including hepatitis-c, HIV, Staphylococcus Aureus and various other life threatening diseases.

Oct
16

Philips Electronic Tattoo: A conecpt to be introduced after 15 years!

Posted by Disha Singh on October 16, 2007

Have you ever imagined how the body art will change in next coming decades? If not then take a look at this sensual video and see something which is beyond imagination! My mouth was wide open when I saw this up-to-the-minute Philips electronic body art project, Skin: Tattoo. Philips Design is again pushing the boundaries and confusing us with its latest contribution to the body art industry.

The SKIN; Tattoo project investigates the use of ‘electronic’ ink that would allow people to have dynamic tattoos with an infinite number of display options. In much the same way as make-up is put on and taken off to suit the occasion, a tattoo could alter whenever desired. The tattoos could even change in response to gestures or emotions, which opens up novel ways of communicating and interacting with others.

Still there are many questions hovering my mind like: how will this ‘electronic’ ink work, will it be safe on the skin, how durable is it, etc. etc.